Archive for the 'Seattle Privacy Coalition' Category

Sawant is a privacy badass; some hope for Dems

With a few very notable exceptions (Mike O’Brien), it has been a huge uphill battle to get Dems at any level of government to acknowledge need for privacy protections or oversight of big data use and sharing, or protection from federal overreach. (Indeed, we had some city council staff openly laughing at us before the Snowden revelations.)

(Councilmember Kshama Sawant deserves special mention for having been on top of this problematic issue since her first day in office, but of course she is not a Dem.)

I have high hopes of the new party leadership in Washington state however, Tina Podlodowski and Joe Pakootas, and now that Mayor Ed Murray is taking a very unambiguous stand on our sanctuary status, hopes that we might get some enforcement teeth in our municipal surveillance ordinance and start setting some precedents. (Such as the right to sue over privacy harms.)

Surveillance most harms vulnerable populations such as immigrants, survivors of domestic violence, and people of color — the people we offer sanctuary.

Here’s a round up of coverage on Sawant’s committee meeting that started investigating federal cameras on SCL poles last week:

Video of the committee meeting

Sawant Blasts Secret Federal Surveillance Cameras on Seattle Utility Poles

Fearing Trump administration’s reach, Seattle City Council fights FBIand SPD’s ‘warrantless surveillance cameras’

Sawant wants to strengthen Seattle’s laws against warrantless surveillance

Surveillance on Seattle’s mind in light of Trump presidency

Sawant moves to curb federal surveillance

Seattle City councilmember wants federal surveillance cameras removed

New push to restrict law enforcement surveillance cameras on City Lightpoles

Court Says Location Of FBI’s Utility Pole-Piggybacking Surveillance Cameras Can Remain Secret

Membership meeting 1/30; meet Seattle CTO

Hey Seattle friends of privacy!

It’s all true: The New York Times reports that President Obama admin today permitted NSA to give raw (that is, unminimized to protect privacy) 12333 surveillance to FBI/CIA/DEA/etc., and here’s the buried lede: “…if analysts stumble across evidence that an American has committed any crime, they will send it to the Justice Department…”.

Furthermore, Rudy Guliani is going to be our nation’s CyberCyber!

Only seven days remain until a junta takes over the surveillance state.

This calls for action. Take a first step by meeting the Chief Technical Officer of the city of Seattle: a good person to talk to about how we can make our own city a refuge.

Please join us at our first general membership meeting of 2017!

When: Monday, Jan 30 545pm – 745pm
Where: Greenwood Library ( 8016 Greenwood Ave N, Seattle, WA 98103)

We will be in the main library meeting room, right as you come in the front door on the right. Free parking is available underneath the building until library close at 8pm; the #5 Metro bus stops directly outside the library going northbound.

Our special guest this month is Michael Mattmiller, the CTO for the City of Seattle.

Like all general Seattle Privacy meetings, the public is most welcome.

Meeting agenda:

– Open meeting with welcome (545pm)

– Intro Michael Mattmiller, CTO for the City of Seattle

10-15 min on role of city CTO generally, background of Mr Mattmiller prior to this position

30-45 min on current City activities as regards privacy (incl some limited Q&A):

– status of Seattle Privacy Initiative
– Seattle City Light programs of late,
– status of SPD mesh network downtown (still hopefully off, but?)
– SDOT networks downtown – what do they do, where are they?

Second Hour: – An open discussion on a day in the life of a Seattleite: the privacy perspective
– daily tasks/activities from privacy perspective for ‘avg’ Seattle resident
– areas of risk
– usual tradeoffs (and why choose one or another)
– mitigation strategies

– wrap up, meeting adjourn

Seattle Privacy welcomes three new board members

Seattle Privacy has added three new members to our Board of Directors: Al Richardson, Will Scott, and Giri Sreenivas.

As we look ahead to the challenges facing civil rights activists, we are excited and grateful to add the wide range of expertise of these board members to our team. Al, Will, and Giri bring outreach, technical, and strategic skills to the board that are already energizing us and helping set our direction for 2017.

Al is a community and union organizer who recently relocated to Seattle from Buffalo, NY. He served as an executive member of the Buffalo Chapter of the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists, and as the local lead for the national Fight for 15 campaign lead by SEIU.

Giri is the CEO and co-founder of Privacy Labs. He has worked on security and mobile projects at startups and large companies. Giri has enjoyed working on a wide range of projects, from developing trusted computing systems for the intelligence community to building consumer mobile experiences on Android. Most recently, he was VP/GM of Mobile at Rapid7 after they acquired Mobilisafe where he was founder/CEO. Find him on Twitter @giri_sreenivas and on the web at https://giri.co.

Will is a web hacker. He grew up in Seattle, and holds a Ph.D. from the UW Computer Science Department focused on Networks and Security. Will has helped to organize Open Seattle and TA3M, and researches Internet censorship, privacy preserving web applications, and cloud security. Find him on twitter at @willscott and on the web at wills.co.tt.

Huge welcome to Al, Giri, and Will!

For a complete list of board members, see About Seattle Privacy.

City of Seattle’s Tech Board restarts Privacy committee

Great news!

The City of Seattle’s Community Technology Advisory Board Sub-Committee for Privacy is restarting and will meet for the first time next week:

Date: October 3

Time: 6PM – 7:45PM

Location: Seattle Public Library Montlake branch, 2401 24th Ave E, Seattle, WA 98112

 

The committee’s new co-chairs are working with the city to get access to official communications channels and the CTAB website, but in the meantime, here’s the agenda, courtesy of Christopher Sheats.

(Full disclosure: Christopher is a Seattle Privacy board member, and one of the Co-Chairs of the city’s new committee.)

Agenda

1. Introductions

2. City of Seattle Privacy Principles + Privacy Impact Assessments

3. City of Seattle Race & Social Justice Initiative

4. City of Seattle Municipal Code 3.23: Seattle IT Department

5. City of Seattle Surveillance Ordinance

6. Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act

7. Policy change opportunities for Seattle

8. Goals for by and for next meeting

 

Please attend if you can.

At Seattle Privacy, we promote engagement of technologists with municipal government to improve policies and policymaking related to privacy.

Working with CTAB is a great way for technical people in Seattle voters to meet other technologists interested in policy issues, meet policy makers, such as Seattle CTO, CPO, and legislators, and have a direct influence on city policy.

Media round-up on Seattle Smart Meters transparency to date

“As US court bans smart meter blueprints from public, sysadmin tells of
fight for security info”
by Shaun Nichols, The Register
May 27, 2016
<http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/05/27/phil_mocek_seattle_smart_meters/>

“`Chilling Attack On Free Speech’: Multinational Corporation Sues Gov’t
Transparency Watchdog MuckRock”
by Kit O’Connell, MintPress News
May 27, 2016
<https://www.mintpressnews.com/chilling-attack-free-speech-multinational-corporation-sues-govt-transparency-watchdog-muckrock/216761/>

“Court Says MuckRock Must Take Down Smart Grid Company’s Documents
Because Judge Has ‘No Time’ To Review Case Properly”
by Tim Cushing, Techdirt
May 31, 2016
<https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20160527/08030834564/court-says-muckrock-must-take-down-smart-grid-companys-documents-because-judge-has-no-time-to-review-case-properly.shtml>